2004 Inductees  

Dr. Charles Rodriguez
Dr. Charley Rodriguez entered aviation during his second year in college. Over the years, he has acquired an A&P mechanics license, private pilot license, inspection authorization, and is an Aviation Safety Counselor for the Springfield Flight Standards District Office (FSDO). As a result of his service to the FAA Springfield FSDO, Dr. Rodriguez received the Good Friend Award in 2004. He has written textbooks for the classes he teaches at SID and was awarded the national Ivan D. Levi Aviation Maintenance Educator of the Year in 1995.

Charley has made numerous presentations concerning flight safety and aviation science education at various aviation events including FAA Wings Seminars, forums at Oshkosh, teacher workshops at Sun 'N Fun, the National Congress on Aviation and Space Education, Women in Aviation Conferences, and Civil Air Patrol to name a few.   He is well-known for the assortment of clever aviation gizmos he has designed and constructed for teaching aeronautical principles.

To help motivate school children, Charley built over 40 airplane school desks. These biplane desks have been delivered to schools throughout Illinois. They are typically used to enhance academic achievement and classroom development.

In his spare time he remains active with the local EAA Chapter 227 and with the assistance of the Rotor and Wing Association of America (RWAA) he continues to organize and conduct airshows. The RWAA - won the National Intercollegiate Aerobatic Championship offered by the International Aerobatic Club in 2001 and 2002.



Stanley Tonkin
Stanley Tonkin became interested in aviation in the 20s and had early rides in an OX5 Curtiss Robin and a Travel Air. He displayed two models at the Chicago Worlds Fair 1933 and in 1936 received instruction in a E-2 Club.

He became an A & E Mechanic, packed parachutes and learned to jump in 1939. He entered the Air Corps in 1942 and was a maintenance inspector. In 1944 he qualified as a flight engineer pilot in B24s and was discharged in 1946.

Following the war, he was a mechanic in general aviation.   He worked on an experimental ground effect flying machine designed by Dr. Lippisch, and built a light airplane intended to be the first plane powered by Wankel engine that was designed by Stan Corcoran. Unfortunately, North American Aviation beat them to it. Stan has donated time and instruction to CAP Cadets in a Cessna L-19. He also volunteered in search and rescue missions during flooding of the Mississippi River.

His ratings include: commercial, airplane single engine land and sea, multi-engine land, instrument airplane, flight instructor, mechanic airframe and power-plant. He is a member of many aviation organizations and was awarded the Charles Taylor Award by the FAA for over 50 years an active A & P Mechanic.

He is also a United Flying Octogenarian (UFO).


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